Entanglement of Software Agents

How some quantum weirdness may be explained by a software model

Mark Burgess

--

Last year, I made a model of quantum entanglement in software. Below, I'll try to explain how to make a model of virtual processes which is dynamically similar to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bell-Aspect experiment, so that a series of independent trials of the experiment converge on the result predicted by quantum mechanics. Some would have it that this is impossible, but here's a proof by demonstration that similar weirdness is not particular to the quantum realm. It shows that entanglement and “spooky action at a distance” exist in everyday software systems. It’s not limited to quantum mechanical particles. This may help us to understand quantum mechanics too.

The common exhortation about “quantum weirdness” seems to be a result of interpreting what happens in too rigidly "classical" a way, and also artificially restricting what classical can be to manufacture a dichotomy. Here quantum-like effects can be understood purely as the result of interior deterministic processes that decouple from the usual linear motion of particles. These result in a dynamical interference.

Intro

Bell's inequalities have been touted as a way to rule out (at least certain kinds of) hidden variable models in quantum mechanics. These arguments are known to overstate what's meant by hidden variables, as Bell himself pointed out over the years. Von Neumann’s classic proof that hidden variables couldn’t work is also known to be wrong. Moreover, there have been numerous papers showing how extremely prosaic classical systems can violate Bell's inequalities — which is not quite the same thing as exhibiting similar behaviour to a quantum entanglement. So far, to my knowledge, no one seems to have just tried to reproduce the results of quantum mechanical predictions explicitly. The world seems still too captivated by the thrall of quantum weirdness to try. So let's try. In a sense, this experiment does exactly what is claimed to be impossible: it shows how hidden variables can generate the quantum result.

I use the term "virtual motion" (or Motion of the Third Kind) to describe what happens when a process propagates across some kind of background of states, like a program running across a network of computers. Waves on water are one kind of virtual motion (the waves move on average, the water doesn't); software agents running the computer cloud are another…

--

--

Mark Burgess

@markburgess_osl on Twitter and Instagram. Science, research, technology advisor and author - see Http://markburgess.org and Https://chitek-i.org